The Drive to Monitor, Enhance and Control Microbial Metabolism

Dr. James J. Sumner

Presented by: 

The Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies and the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

Speaker(s): 

Dr. James J. Sumner
Biotechnology Branch, SEDD
U.S. Army Research Laboratory

Date: 

April 1, 2015

Time: 

(All day)

Location: 

UCSB

Description: 

Dr. James J. Sumner from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory will discuss how bioelectrochemistry at ARL, in collaboration with UCSB and the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, has diversified by launching from biological fuel cells and biosensors to a broad set of possible future applications.

Abstract: 

Energy demands and environmental concerns dominate the landscape of many operational environments including development, habitation, manufacturing, agriculture and others. Alternative energy, green chemistry and bioremediation are just a few research areas that have been developing rapidly due to these pressures. The field of bioelectrochemistry has its roots all the way back to the time of Volta, but has diversified greatly since the year 2000. Modern technical hurdles include: understanding electron/charge transfer in biological and bio/inorganic hybrid structures; engineering functional, stable, biotic/abiotic interactions; and the ability to monitor, control, enhance, and model microbial metabolism. This seminar will cover how bioelectrochemistry at ARL, in collaboration with UCSB and the Instirute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, has diversified by launching from biological fuel cells and biosensors to a broad set of possible future applications.

Biography: 

James J. Sumner received a B.S. in chemistry (summa cum laude) from High Point University in 1995 and earned a Ph.D. in chemistry (analytical/electrochemistry) from Clemson University in 2000. He joined the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) in Adelphi, MD in 2002 after working as an American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Postdoctoral Fellow at ARL. Dr. Sumner has over 15 years experience as an analytical chemist. His current work focuses on biophotonic and bioelectronics research as applied to biological and chemical sensor development including studies of DNA hybridization by electrochemical and spectroscopic methods as well as research and development in bioelectrochemical systems. He has also been conducting collaborative research in the field of novel biotechnology applications in the areas of power and energy and waste remediation. Dr. Sumner’s scientific contributions are evidenced by his 25 open literature publications and book chapters, which have been favorably cited over 600 times, and by his 2 patent disclosures.